Sandways Beach 

4.5 (2 ratings)
  • 50° 20' 20" N, 4° 11' 14" W / See on the map

Characteristics

  • Anchor
    Allowed
  • Mooring buoys
    Unavailable
  • Anchor stern to
    Unavailable
  • Lines ashore
    Not necessary

Type of seabed

  • Sand

Protection against wind & swell

Reachable by dinghy

  • Beach
    Available
  • Snack
    Unavailable
  • Water
    Unavailable
  • Dock
    Unavailable

User reviews (2 ratings)

  • Duncan ~ 14/05/2021

    The beach is known as Sandways Beach and is popular with locals who wish for a quieter beach, than the beaches of Kingsand and Cawsand, especially in high season. The anchorage is slightly more exposed than those at the western end of Cawsand Bay. Whilst it is possible to anchor overnight in fine weather, close attention should be paid to the weather forecast, as the anchorage is exposed to Southerly, Southeasterly and Easterly winds and affords less protection from prevailing Southwesterly winds than anchorages closer to the villages of Kingsand and Cawsand, which benefit somewhat from being in the lee of the Rame Peninsula. Most regard this anchorage as a Day anchorage and leave for their moorings in late afternoon/evening for the Port of Plymouth. The three old buildings built on the shoreline, the centre one being a ruin are Pilchard Stores from a by gone era. The walk from Sandways Beach to Kingsand is either a walk along the rocks past the Pilchard Stores or via the Minnadhu. Minnadhu in Cornish means ‘Black Place or Black Rock’ and is where fisherman of old used to hang their tared Pilchard nets to dry. Walkers with dogs should keep their dogs on a lead when walking the Minnadhu as the area has a significant population of Adders (Poisonous Snake) Both routes are not suitable for disabled walkers with significant walking difficulties. Note: When making passage from and to the Port of Plymouth for this anchorage. Leave plenty of sea room when passing Picklecombe Point and Hooe Lake Point (Maker) as submerged rocks extend some considerable way from the shoreline. It is suggested to pass south of the port hand bouy at Fort Picklecombe (Queens Ground Bouy). From Sandways Point eastwards the seabed hardens from fine sand to rock, interspersed with patches of fine sand and this may have a bearing on the type of anchor needed.

    The beach is known as Sandways Beach and is popular with locals who wish for a quieter beach, than the beaches of Kingsand and Cawsand, especially in high season. The anchorage is slightly more exposed than those at the western end of Cawsand Bay. Whilst it is possible to anchor overnight in fine weather, close attention should be paid to the weather forecast, as the anchorage is exposed to Southerly, Southeasterly and Easterly winds and affords less protection from prevailing Southwesterly winds than anchorages closer to the villages of Kingsand and Cawsand, which benefit somewhat from being in the lee of the Rame Peninsula. Most regard this anchorage as a Day anchorage and leave for their moorings in late afternoon/evening for the Port of Plymouth. The three old buildings built on the shoreline, the centre one being a ruin are Pilchard Stores from a by gone era. The walk from Sandways Beach to Kingsand is either a walk along the rocks past the Pilchard Stores or via the Minnadhu. Minnadhu in Cornish means ‘Black Place or Black Rock’ and is where fisherman of old used to hang their tared Pilchard nets to dry. Walkers with dogs should keep their dogs on a lead when walking the Minnadhu as the area has a significant population of Adders (Poisonous Snake) Both routes are not suitable for disabled walkers with significant walking difficulties. Note: When making passage from and to the Port of Plymouth for this anchorage. Leave plenty of sea room when passing Picklecombe Point and Hooe Lake Point (Maker) as submerged rocks extend some considerable way from the shoreline. It is suggested to pass south of the port hand bouy at Fort Picklecombe (Queens Ground Bouy). From Sandways Point eastwards the seabed hardens from fine sand to rock, interspersed with patches of fine sand and this may have a bearing on the type of anchor needed.

  • Chasing Contours
    Chasing Contours ~ 26/09/2020
    Shadowfax | Sailboat ~ 13 m

    A good alternative to the more favoured South side side of the bay when the wind has a North element. Use Google Earth to see where the sand is and anchor in 3-6m of water. Good holding with easy access to the shore and beach.

    A good alternative to the more favoured South side side of the bay when the wind has a North element. Use Google Earth to see where the sand is and anchor in 3-6m of water. Good holding with easy access to the shore and beach.